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Last Update on October 31, 2014 07:08 GMT

MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY-"INTERSTELLAR"

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- It's expected to be one of the top movies of the year. And with "Interstellar" soon hitting theaters, we'll see whether the predictions will come true. The movie is set in the near future -- after Earth has been hit with a blight that wipes out most of its food sources. Enter Matthew McConaughey -- or at least his character. He plays a widowed pilot who is asked to leave his children behind to head out on a space mission to find out if there are any other planets where humans can thrive. McConaughey says he didn't quite grasp the science behind the movie. He says it took him more than five hours to get through his first read of the script. Even then, he had questions for director Christopher Nolan and the astrophysicist who was helping with the production. The movie opens next week.

Matthew McConaughey says it took some time to get his head around the script for "Interstellar," even with the help of director Christopher Nolan. ((longer version of cut in wrap))

<<CUT ..003 (10/31/14)>> 00:09 "the actor work"

Matthew McConaughey

Matthew McConaughey says once he got a handle on the science behind "Interstellar," he was able to dive into the role.

<<CUT ..004 (10/31/14)>> 00:09 "on the ground"

Matthew McConaughey

Matthew McConaughey says unlike most kids, he never dreamed of being an astronaut. ((longer version of cut used in wrap))

<<CUT ..005 (10/31/14)>> 00:19 ""

Sound of Matthew McConaughey

Sound of Matthew McConaughey from the trailer for the movie "Interstellar."

NICOLE KIDMAN-SHEEPISH

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Nicole Kidman can pretty much get whatever kind of part she wants these days. But that wasn't the case when she was 5 -- and she missed out on a coveted role. She says she wanted to play Mary or maybe an angel in her school's nativity play. But she ended up cast as a sheep. She says she still remembers her costume: one of those fleece-looking car seats cover converted into an outfit by her mom. She says playing a sheep wasn't her finest moment as an actress, but she "felt amazing." She says she "bleated through the whole play" and even got a laugh -- and she was hooked. Kidman stars in "Before I Go To Sleep" a movie about a woman whose memory is wiped clean every night.

Nicole Kidman recalls her first acting role.

<<CUT ..008 (10/31/14)>> 00:09 "my whole career"

Nicole Kidman

Nicole Kidman says while she wanted a bigger role, she was thrilled with her first acting part.

<<CUT ..009 (10/31/14)>> 00:17 "secretly doing it"

Nicole Kidman

Nicole Kidman recalls some of her earliest childhood memories. ((note length of cut))

ALLMAN MOVIE-LAWSUIT

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) -- Gregg Allman is no longer involved in a lawsuit filed by the family of a movie crew worker killed by a train during the shooting of a movie about the musician. Lawyers for the parents of Sarah Jones say they have decided to dismiss all claims against Allman and two other parties. The decision was made after going over thousands of documents and other evidence in the case. The attorney says it's clear Allman "had no involvement" in any of the decisions that led to Jones' death. Allman was an executive producer of the movie based on his life story -- but has moved to distance himself from the project since the crew member's death. Members of the crew were struck by a freight train as they worked on a rail bridge. CSX says it denied the film crew access to the area.

CHRIS BROWN-SETTLEMENT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Chris Brown has settled a lawsuit stemming from his punching a man outside a Washington D.C. hotel a year ago. The lawyer for the man who suffered a broken nose in the incident says his client and Brown have reached a deal on a lawsuit. No details on how much the settlement was worth. Brown pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault on Sept. 2. The singer admitted hitting Parker Adams, who tried to get in a picture the singer was taking with two women outside the W hotel in October 2013. Brown was sentenced to time served.

"TINY" HARRIS-EYES

NEW YORK (AP) -- Some people are criticizing reality TV star Tiny Harris -- for failing to keep it real when it comes to her eyes. She's drawing fire from social media haters and some eye doctors over a procedure she underwent to have her eyes permanently lightened. They were once brown; now they're ice gray. Harris is thrilled with the results, telling ABC she had the cosmetic eye implants done in Africa. She says of her new eyes: "they're amazing." Some medical pros aren't so impressed. New York ophthalmologist James Tsai says such cosmetic procedures are illegal in the U.S. And he says those who have the procedure run the risk of getting glaucoma, cataracts, bleeding in the eyes -- or problems with their corneas.

"THE VIEW"-NEWS

NEW YORK (AP) -- It was a tug-of-war between two divisions within ABC -- entertainment and news. "The View" will now come under the command and control of ABC News. The move ends an 18-year run with the daytime chat-fest being under the network's entertainment wing. It may prove to be a hollow victory. The show's ratings have dropped since shifting to a new set of hosts going into this season. The current panel is made up of Rosie O'Donnell, Nicolle Wallace and Rosie Perez -- and the lone holdover from the glory days, Whoopi Goldberg.

"GAME OF THRONES"-SUSPENSION

PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) -- "Game of Thrones" is a popular TV series. But a slogan from the HBO show wasn't as well received when it ended up posted online by a New Jersey professor. Francis Schmidt teaches art and animation at Bergen County Community College. He says he was suspended eight days after posting a photo of his 7-year-old daughter wearing a T-shirt with the slogan: "I will take what is mine with fire and blood." Now school officials have overturned the punishment, saying the suspension may have violated his constitutional rights. Schmidt said that school officials wondered if the reference was a threat against a dean, who was one of the people who saw the online post.

JORGE GARCIA-COSTUME

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- If you see a rather large fellow decked out in an Elvis costume today, take a close look -- you might have seen him on TV. Jorge Garcia says he has forked over $3,700 on a "Dragon" jumpsuit, styled after the kind Elvis Presley used to wear. It's white with colorful dragons stitched into the front and back. Garcia says he always wanted to have one -- and now that he has made good money from "Lost" and "Hawaii Five-O," he decided to splurge.

Rewind Time

November 01, 2014 07:09 GMT

Today is Saturday, Nov. 1, the 305th day of 2014. There are 60 days left in the year. This is All Saints Day. A reminder: Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday. Clocks go back one hour.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Nov. 1, 1954, Algerian nationalists began their successful 7-year rebellion against French rule.

On this date:

In 1512, Michelangelo's just-completed paintings on the ceiling of the Vatican's Sistine Chapel were publicly unveiled by the artist's patron, Pope Julius II.

In 1604, William Shakespeare's tragedy "Othello" was presented at Whitehall Palace in London.

In 1765, the Stamp Act went into effect, prompting stiff resistance from American colonists.

In 1861, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln named Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan General-in-Chief of the Union armies, succeeding Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott.

In 1864, the U.S. Postal money order system was established by an act of Congress.

In 1870, the United States Weather Bureau made its first meteorological observations.

In 1936, in a speech in Milan, Italy, Benito Mussolini described the alliance between his country and Nazi Germany as an "axis" running between Rome and Berlin.

In 1944, "Harvey," a comedy by Mary Chase about a genial fellow named Elwood P. Dowd and his friend, an invisible six-foot-three rabbit, opened on Broadway.

In 1952, the United States exploded the first hydrogen bomb, code-named "Ivy Mike," at Enewetak (en-ih-WEE'-tahk) Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

In 1968, the Motion Picture Association of America unveiled its new voluntary film rating system: G for general, M for mature (later changed to GP, then PG), R for restricted and X (later changed to NC-17) for adults only.

In 1979, former first lady Mamie Eisenhower died in Washington, D.C., at age 82.

In 1989, East Germany reopened its border with Czechoslovakia, prompting tens of thousands of refugees to flee to the West.

Ten years ago: American contract worker Roy Hallums was one of several people kidnapped during an armed assault on the Baghdad compound where he lived (Hallums was rescued by coalition forces on Sept. 7, 2005). A 16-year-old Palestinian laden with explosives blew himself up in an outdoor market in Tel Aviv, killing three Israelis. U.N. nuclear agency chief Mohamed ElBaradei (ehl-BEHR'-uh-day) urged Iran to suspend uranium enrichment and called on North Korea to dismantle its weapons program.

Five years ago: Afghan President Hamid Karzai's challenger, former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah, withdrew from an upcoming runoff election, effectively handing Karzai a victory. Lender CIT Group filed one of the biggest Chapter 11 bankruptcy filings in U.S. corporate history. (CIT Group emerged from bankruptcy protection the following month.) The New York Yankees took a 3-1 lead in the World Series as they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 7-4. Meb Keflezighi (keh-FLEZ'-gee) became the first U.S. man in 27 years to win the New York City Marathon, in a time of 2:09:15; Ethiopian runner Derartu Tulu won the women's title in 2:28:52.

One year ago: A man carrying a bag with a note that said he "wanted to kill TSA" opened fire with a semi-automatic rifle at a security checkpoint at Los Angeles International Airport, killing a TSA officer and wounding two others; the gunman, who was wounded, was taken into custody. (Gerardo Hernandez, 39, became the first TSA officer in the agency's 12-year history to be killed in the line of duty; Paul Ciancia pleaded not guilty to 11 federal charges, including murder of a federal officer.) A U.S. drone strike killed Hakimullah Mehsud (hah-kee-MUH'-lah meh-SOOD'), leader of the Pakistani Taliban.

Today's Birthdays: Actress Betsy Palmer is 88. Golfer Gary Player is 79. Country singer Bill Anderson is 77. Actress Barbara Bosson is 75. Actor Robert Foxworth is 73. Magazine publisher Larry Flynt is 72. Country singer-humorist Kinky Friedman is 70. Actress Jeannie Berlin is 65. Music producer David Foster is 65. Rhythm-and-blues musician Ronald Khalis Bell (Kool and the Gang) is 63. Country singer-songwriter-producer Keith Stegall is 60. Country singer Lyle Lovett is 57. Actress Rachel Ticotin is 56. Rock musician Eddie MacDonald (The Alarm) is 55. Actress Helene Udy is 53. Rock singer Anthony Kiedis (Red Hot Chili Peppers) is 52. Pop singer-musician Mags Furuholmen (a-ha) is 52. Rock musician Rick Allen (Def Leppard) is 51. Country singer "Big Kenny" Alphin (Big and Rich) is 51. Singer Sophie B. Hawkins is 50. Rapper Willie D (Geto Boys) is 48. Country musician Dale Wallace (Emerson Drive) is 45. Actress Toni Collette is 42. Actress-talk show host Jenny McCarthy is 42. Rock musician Andrew Gonzales is 42. Actor David Berman is 41. Actress Aishwarya Rai (ash-WAHR'-ee-ah rye) is 41. Rock singer Bo Bice is 39. Actor Matt Jones is 33. Actress Natalia Tena is 30. Actor Penn Badgley is 28. Actor Max Burkholder is 17. Actor-musician Alex Wolff is 17.

Thought for Today: "Years ago my mother used to say to me, she'd say, 'In this world, Elwood, you must be' -- she always called me Elwood -- 'In this world, you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant.' Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me." -- "Elwood P. Dowd" from the play "Harvey" by Mary Chase (1906-1981).

Copyright 2014, The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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