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Mission's epilepsy unit provides answers locally

Charles Bosshard was filmed having a seizure while trying to sleep at the Mission Epilepsy Center and Monitoring Unit in Asheville. However, there was no shaking or loss of consciousness. (photo credit: WLOS staff)

Capturing seizures on camera led to a definitive diagnosis and treatment for a local 20-year-old.

Charles Bosshard was filmed having a seizure while trying to sleep at the Mission Epilepsy Center and Monitoring Unit in Asheville. However, there was no shaking or loss of consciousness.

"He has a seizure we call focal seizures," Mission neurologist Suzette Laroche explained. "They're not quite as obvious," she continued. "He'll get confused, won't remember what happened."

"The whole day is just blank space," Bosshard said of a day with seizures. "All I know is what other people tell me."

What Dr. Laroche told him is that his problem -- complex partial seizures -- has been identified after six years, and a new medication regimen appears to be working.

"I felt extreme relief and gratitude, because my son had been suffering," said Holly Bosshard, Charles' mother.

"The majority of people with epilepsy have completely normal lives," Laroche said. "They can work. After they've been without seizures for six months, they can return to driving. They can go to college."

That's just what Bosshard plans to do with a lot less monitoring.

Cities the size of Asheville often don't have an epilepsy center. Mission providers said it's important locally because patients having seizures can't drive and often don't travel well.

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