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Hip replacement patients get on their feet faster

Doctors' visits are new to David Lauffer, who recently had a hip replacement. "The direct anterior approach is just one small part of what I like to call the Functionally Accelerated Surgical Technique, getting better FAST," said orthopedic surgeon Tony McPherron, explaining the acronym. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

Doctors' visits are new to David Lauffer, and sports may be the reason why.

"In high school, I played four major sports: cross country, track, basketball, and baseball," said Lauffer. "In college, I narrowed it down to cross country and track."

As a working adult, he continued playing church league softball, but the hip pain became too much.

X-rays show his hip replacement, completed at Harris Regional in Sylva without cutting muscle.

"The direct anterior approach is just one small part of what I like to call the Functionally Accelerated Surgical Technique, getting better FAST," said orthopedic surgeon Tony McPherron, explaining the acronym.

"An hour and a half after surgery, this PT physical therapy lady comes in says, 'Let's get you walking,' and I'm dumbfounded," recalled Lauffer.

"It starts with education. It's your diet, it's physical therapy buying in, and it's anesthesia buying in so patients aren't so knocked out after surgery," said Dr. McPherron.

Results include reduced complications, quicker discharge and faster recovery.

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