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Incontinence treatment is possible

The frustration of urinary incontinence brought 61-year-old Lori DeMase to Dr. Tristan Keys at Victoria Urological, an affiliate of Mission Health. (Photo credit: WLOS Staff)

"Every day, I'm mopping my floors from the bedroom to the bathroom."

The frustration of urinary incontinence brought 61-year-old Lori DeMase to Dr. Tristan Keys at Victoria Urological, an affiliate of Mission Health.

He treats the problem all the time.

"Up to 50 or 60 percent of women in their lives will have some type of incontinence," Keys explained.

"Seems like as soon as I drink a glass of water, I'd have this symptom to go and I'd try to go, but I wouldn't get there in time," DeMase said. "So, that's when I knew I had trouble."

"The issue with incontinence is that it's not going to kill you, but it is a big bother and has a big impact on your overall quality of life," Keys added.

Quite often, DeMase said she makes no less than 15 trips to the bathroom.

The doctor diagnosed her with an overactive bladder, recommended fluid modifications, and prescribed medication to reduce urine output.

"She's doing much better," Keys insisted. "The frequency of urination is much improved, and she's not leaking as much."

"I'm hoping to just be normal and not wet myself when I go to the store," DeMase said.

Keys said an all-out cure isn't likely. But, over time, the symptoms can be better controlled, resulting in improved quality of life.

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