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Asheville City Council passes 'Brunch Bill,' OKs vote on city council districts

The Asheville City Council is met Tuesdayto discuss a number of items, and one of them was the so-called "Brunch Bill." Council passed the ordinance allowing alcoholic beverage sales starting at 10 a.m. on Sundays. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

The Asheville City Council met Tuesday to discuss a number of items, and one of them was the so-called "Brunch Bill."

Council passed the ordinance allowing alcoholic beverage sales starting at 10 a.m. on Sundays.

Council also took up a referendum to give Asheville residents a chance to vote on a change to an electoral district system for city council elections. That comes despite a bill passed in Raleigh that already says districts must be created by November, or the state will step in and create them.

In other action, the city will spend $400,000 more on its transit system.

City council approved $850,000 in last month's budget, but once the department got estimates from a contractor, city officials realized they needed much more.

The new contract focuses on higher performance standards - like timeliness, vehicle maintenance, new equipment and a customer complaint system.

Asheville residents will be voting on whether or not they want six single-member electoral districts in November.

Right now, all six council members are elected at-large. The state recently passed a bill to change that.

Vice Mayor Gwen Wisler said the council wanted to give residents an opportunity to weigh in and will take their decision to the state.

"It's not completely clear now as to what would happen if citizens won't vote for it, but this will give citizens the opportunity to say no and then follow up with state as to how we go forward," Wisler said.

If residents support electoral districting, it will be effective November 2018.

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