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Asheville priest says healing comes from prayer and helping those around you

The Rev. Milly Morrow, of Cathedral of All Souls, said people must first understand violence has always existed and the answer to fighting it starts within and extends to those around us. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

People across the country are dealing with the trauma of the Las Vegas massacre -- even if they weren't there. Many are praying for the victims and their families. But a local priest said the healing must to go beyond prayer.

The Rev. Milly Morrow, of Cathedral of All Souls, said people must first understand violence has always existed and the answer to fighting it starts within and extends to those around us.

Morrow and her daughter were out for a stroll Monday, celebrating Sadie's 10th birthday. It was a wonderful, sunny fall day in Asheville, a far cry from the deadly chaos in Las Vegas.

Morrow is a therapist who specializes in working with victims of violent crime. She became an Episcopal priest seven years ago.

Morrow said everyone is affected by the horror that happened Sunday night, calling it widespread post traumatic stress.

"That is real, whether we were there that day or whether we had family members there that day, we are part of a global community," Morrow said.

The initial reaction at Cathedral of All Souls in Biltmore Village was votive candles -- an invitation to light one and pray for victims of the mass shooting.

"I think there is a sense of what do I do beyond simply offering this to God," Morrow said.

Morrow believes the answer is in taking action -- volunteer, help those in need, stop dwelling on something that can't be changed.

"The first thing people do is sit down at the computer, sit down at the television and, for hours sometimes, stare at the details of the events," Morrow said.

Her advice is to get up and get involved, to help yourself and everyone around you.

"Be prayerful people, yes, but pray with our feet, get out there and serve and stay engaged," Morrow said. "It helps our mental health and our spirititual health when we stay engaged with the community, especially during tragic times like this."

Morrow said if you need help, don't be afraid to ask a minister, priest, rabbi or therapist.

We all have to cope with the crisis, are all in this together and should not lose hope, she said.

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