MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

NASA & PARI scientists in prime seat to analyze the eclipse

While tourists and locals are enjoying the eclipse in and around Western North Carolina, NASA and PARI scientists will be analyzing the eclipse from the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. (Photo credit: WLOS Staff)

While tourists and locals are enjoying the eclipse in and around Western North Carolina, NASA and PARI scientists will be analyzing the eclipse from the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute.

Officials say because the core of the sun will be blocked by the moon it's a chance for them to study the outer rays, which officials there say is huge for them.

PARI, which is near Brevard, is the first research institute of its kind to be in the path of a total eclipse.

So researchers say they don't know what they'll discover.

They'll be using a number of optical cameras and radio telescopes to make that happen.

Scientists are on-site all day, but the magic moment comes at 2:36 p.m. and lasts about 1 minute and 47 seconds.

Scientists say for everyone else, to really take in what this eclipse has to offer, it's extremely important to be in the right spot.

Don Cline, President, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), "some people feel that they can go out and watch the eclipse from their home or location like for Asheville and if you do, you'll miss the main feature of seeing the solar eclipose and that is stars in the middle of the day."

Cline says you have to be in totality to see stars.

PARI is offering a live stream, starting at 9 a.m., from their YouTube channel. You can watch presentations from NASA researchers and PARI's very own Dr. Bob Hayward.


Trending