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PARI officials excited about upcoming eclipse

"All the science and everything else is fine. It's just the awe of it," said Dr. Bob Hayward, an astronomer at PARI. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

The excitement continues to grow over the 2017 total solar eclipse with PARI hosting another event to teach people what to expect on the big day.

"All the science and everything else is fine. It's just the awe of it," said Dr. Bob Hayward, an astronomer at PARI.

He spoke to a room of individuals excited about what's to come Aug. 21.

"There are going to be more people on Earth seeing this solar eclipse, be it partial or total, than any solar exlipse in history," said Hayward.

What's even better for the folks at PARI is the fact they may be making a bit of history themselves.

To their knowledge, no other radio observatory has been under the path of totality during a solar eclipse.

"Even if we don't find anything special, at least you've proved that it's not there, that there's nothing special about it. But it is something that if we find something out, something about the temperature or concentration of hydrogen or something that nobody expected, we've made a scientific discovery," said Hayward.

According to the research center's calculations, the eclipse will begin in Rosman at 1:07 p.m. with totality starting at 2:36 p.m.

Hayward said it should last about 1 minute and 47 seconds.

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