MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Turpin abuse case brings out best in humanity, including shipment from Hendersonville

Sara McCord of Hendersonville believes her Girls of Faith dolls will bring comfort to a family that desperately needs to know how much people care. The story of the Turpin family including 13 tortured and neglected children in California struck a nerve across the world. (Photo credit: WLOS Staff)

The worst of times bring out the best in humanity, so it's no surprise a disturbing case of child abuse on the West Coast has people across the world reaching out to help.

Sara McCord of Hendersonville believes her Girls of Faith dolls will bring comfort to a family that desperately needs to know how much people care. The story of the Turpin family including 13 tortured and neglected children in California struck a nerve across the world.

Sara reached out to the Corona Chamber of Commerce, which is collecting money supplies for the Turpin's, realizing what the victims have been through is a test of faith.

"It's hard when you've undergone such horrible treatment to know that there is a loving God because if there was then why would that have happened," Sara observed.

Her cash-strapped start-up company asked for donations to cover the cost of 10 dolls to ship out west. Sara's Facebook post raised enough money to make it happen. The dolls arrived in California late last week.

Corona Chamber President Bobby Spiegel says every gesture shows the kids how much they're loved. So far, cash donations alone add up to well over$400,000.

"What Sara has done, a small business owner, to take this on and do this," Spiegel said. "I want her to be in my chamber of commerce because she is the epitome of what our businesses here also do."

McCord sees great possibilities in the dolls she created to inspire little girls. She launched Girls of Faith Dolls just seven months ago.

"I never thought of an entrepreneur and I had this idea that I just couldn't get rid of, and I really felt the need to make it happen," she said. "And I feel like bringing faith back into something that is interesting to little girls, fun for little girls, creative, just a new fresh way to look at things."

The 18 inch dolls won't change the Turpin family's past, but Sara hopes they offer a source of healing in the days and months ahead.

"I think everyone that donated feels a little bit of the weight from hearing the story lift when they know they can do something to improve the girls' lives," Sara said.

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending