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Optometrist shows kids how to safely watch the eclipse

Dr. Craig Poole stopped by Hendersonville Elementary School before the eclipse to caution the students about the serious side of that spectacular event. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

Millions of people watched the solar eclipse Monday afternoon, and many of those were small children.

One local doctor wanted to make sure children in Western North Carolina watched the event safely.

Dr. Craig Poole stopped by Hendersonville Elementary School before the eclipse to caution the students about the serious side of that spectacular event.

"So, no matter where you are, if you look at that eclipse, that little bit of the sun is so intense that it can cause permanent damage to your eye," he cautioned.

The optometrist said Monday's event was something the students would remember for a lifetime. And he wanted those memories to be good ones.

"I'm excited about it because both of my parents have seen one, and I want to see one, too," fifth-grader Mason said.

Poole said there were many misconceptions about what is safe and what is not safe to do while viewing the eclipse.

"Especially kids who have eyes that are developing, and I wanted to make sure they knew what to look out for and what to do," Poole said.

"We're going to put your glasses up to your face to make sure you don't get blind," fifth-grader Isabella said.

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