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Inside the Story: Barber still cutting hair at 90 years old

Inside the Story: Barber still cutting hair at 90 years old (Photo: KUTV)

MIDVALE, Utah (KUTV) The Barber School in Midvale has become a premier barber teaching ground for dozens of students who are performing more than 150 services a day -- from cutting hair, to shaving, to scalp work, to interacting with customers.

And the man sharing his trade secrets to students is 90-year-old Tim Hite, a legend in the barbering profession who still shows up to work every day.

"I love to cut hair," Hite said.

Hite grew up with a fascination for barbering.

"I can make you look different ways by your hair cut," he said.

After spending six years in the Navy during World War II, Hite went into barbering school and traveled across the world to places like London, Brussels, Germany, Paris, Africa, Canada and Mexico.

A couple of his fellow students just happened to be the iconic Paul Mitchell and Vidal Sassoon, long before they became famous.

"Those are just two guys I worked with," Hite said of his classmates.

When 2News asked what Mitchell and Sassoon were like, Hite said, "Well, they wanted to be good and they worked hard at being good. And that's when you're good."

Hite has won numerous awards, including Barber of the Year and Utah State Men's Hair Styling Champion.

At one time he was running 14 salons, but his real love is teaching.

"You never quit learning if you are a learner. I'm a learner."

And that's why he's opened up The Barber School.

"Because I thought people should cut hair better and I wanted to share what I have with them," he said.

One of Hite's master hair cutting moves is called the "Drop Dead Technique," where you work from the back to the front so that way if the customer has to leave they can still walk away with a great haircut.

And his advice for those wanting to become a barber: "You have to be really, really, really, really interested. If you're not that interested, you are probably not going to make it."

For students like Stacy Waggoner, who wants to open up h is own barber shop, Hite’s knowledge is priceless.

"It truly is an art to see Mr. Hite cut hair," Waggoner said.

So maybe the name Tim Hite is not a Paul Mitchell or Vidal Sassoon, but this man who has lived nearly a century is creating his own legacy. One he plans to keep sharing until his last breath.

"I don't know, today could be it," he said. "I want it to count so I'm going to make the most of every minute."

For more about Hite and The Barber School, you can visit the school's website.


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