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Reality Check
 
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Reality Check: Rolling Oaks Debate

Updated: Friday, August 2 2013, 09:22 PM EDT
Residents in Rolling Oaks Estates say the City of Asheville owes them a paving job.

They say a road leading to their neighborhood is filled with pot holes, but the city says it's not their problem.

The entrance to Rolling Oaks Estates is pretty well traveled, and there are plenty of pot holes to prove it.

Jo Hannah, Rolling Oaks resident, "and every day that those are not fixed.. I see those holes getting bigger and bigger."

Susan Montella, the neighborhood association's treasurer decided to do something about it, "he told me we're the only ones that use it."

She dug up maps and documents recorded at the courthouse and went to Jerry Yates from Public Works in 2011. 

Susan Montella, Rolling Oaks treasurer, "what did he say when you showed him the hole?  It's not their problem. It doesn't belong to them.."

City officials insist this stretch of Rolling Oaks Drive belongs to homeowners.
 
"The speed limit sign, that's where Rolling Oaks starts.  That's where rolling oaks starts, right. And all of this you say is the city's?  Correct." 

But she and other residents don't believe it.

William Connell, Rolling Oaks resident, "because these houses here are on city property.  They are city residents."

Asheville City Police even have community watch signs on the street they say they're not responsible for.

"I think the city doesn't care because we live in the county."

"I've been going through everything and I have proof saying that this is definitely the city."

Montella is now sharing her findings with other residents and us, hoping the city will give them some answers.

"I'd like to see them come in and pave and take care of the filling of it and do what they're responsible for."

The city's assistant director of public works says the street is in the city, but it remains a private road because the developer never transferred it to the city's or state's possession.

Reality Check: Rolling Oaks Debate


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