As snowstorm looms, some recall one of the worst to hit the mountains

It's been 25 years since the "Storm of the Century.” Now, weather models show some parts of the mountains could see similar amounts of snow this weekend. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

It's been 25 years since the "Storm of the Century.” Now, weather models show some parts of the mountains could see similar amounts of snow this weekend.

We spoke with former News 13 employees about their time covering the Blizzard of '93.

“I’ve never seen that much snow beforehand, and I’ve never seen that much snow since,” said Susan Mundy, who was a new producer at WLOS during the blizzard.

“Seemed like it was very chaotic,” Mundy said, referring to the newsroom environment. “Everybody was working long hours, trying to do the best we could to get the information out to the people, because we knew that we were the lifeline for so many people.”

In a time without Facebook, Twitter or any social media, people turned to News 13 for potentially lifesaving updates.

“That's the Super Bowl of reporting, when you have an event like that,” said Sherrill Barber, who was a reporter during storm.

When he thinks back on the Blizzard of '93, he says one story sticks out -- a group of campers lost in Great Smoky Mountains National Park for four days during the storm.

“It was a key story, a national story, as well, and people wanted to know what was being done about this,” Barber said.

Barber was there when the rescued campers were reunited with friends and family.

“That's something that will bring tears to my eyes just thinking about," he said.

Fast forward to 2018. Though it's impossible to know exactly how bad the storm will be this weekend, the people who were on the frontlines covering the last major snowstorm have some advice.

“It's always important to think of your pets, your neighbors and yourself and what is your emergency plan of actions,” Mundy said.

“You don’t want to be caught out in it,” Barber said.

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