Buncombe County farmer puts her high-profile garden on lockdown

Franny Tacy, the first woman in North Carolina to grow industrial hemp, has had to beef up security on her Buncombe County farm. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

A mountain farmer's high-profile crop, knowledge and business savvy are becoming too popular.

Franny Tacy, the first woman in North Carolina to grow industrial hemp, has had to beef up security on her Buncombe County farm.

Farmer Franny and her venue are well known for so many things, from weddings to the Eco-Airbnb, kids' camps, even goat yoga.

"As for our farm, we are having to close to the public" Tacy said.

That's because there's been recent concern about people wanting too much of an industrial hemp pioneer who's torn between her own crop and promoting a new, booming business.

"With getting out there, and education and collaboration being such a focus for me, I think it has also put me a little bit as a targeted point of people that want to communicate and connect with me," Tacy said. "Used to be, you had to grow this as a farmer to support your nation."

Communicate and connect, as Tacy and her crew cultivate flowering hemp plants, the first full season grow since the state pilot program began. If these plants thrive, they'll drive Tacy's line of cannabidiol products -- CBD from Franny's Farmacy.

Tacy's just too busy right now for one-on-one advice, but folks from all across the country are still stopping in, often unannounced and sometimes way after hours.

"If people are doing something in the dark of night, behind a locked gate and electric netting, then it's probably not something they would be doing during the day," Tacy said.

So, Franny's Farm goes on lock down ... high security.

"Motion lights, and we've got locks, coded locks, and there's a pretty cool drone security system that's motion activated," she said.

Also, old-school, hand-stenciled signs for the road leading in say no activities except for private events and by appointment only for the next seven weeks.

Tacy said it has to be all about agriculture's annual task at hand, no matter what you're growing.

"We're going to focus on the farmers, getting our crop harvested, dried and sent out, so that we can carry on," she said.

Franny's Farm reopens Sept. 21 and will host HempX Asheville. Click here to learn more about the event.

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