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Wiseman's neighbors say authorities have been in and out of the contractor's Georgia home

Three pieces of packaging tape blocked access to the front steps of the Georgia home of a contractor tied to a kickback scheme involving former Buncombe County officials. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

Three pieces of packaging tape blocked access to the front steps of the Georgia home of a contractor tied to a kickback scheme involving former Buncombe County officials.

Buncombe County’s former top three officials -- John Creighton, Wanda Green and Mandy Stone -- are accused of illegally accepting gifts and trips from an Atlanta-area contractor in exchange for county contracts.

Buncombe County identified the contractor as Joseph Wiseman Jr., though he was not identified in the indictments.

Officials said, in 2014, Wiseman registered a company at his home address in Roswell, Georgia.

On Thursday, there was a car in the driveway and a package on the front steps, but News 13 could not knock on the door because of the tape.

The indictments issued earlier this week said, dating to the mid-1980s, three companies with ties to Wiseman received about $15 million in business from Buncombe County. Of that, about $1.9 million went to the company he started in 2014, the company listed at his home address.

Neighbors said, in recent weeks, they had seen up to 20 law enforcement vehicles at Wiseman’s home. One neighbor called the Wisemans an all-American family. Another said they were very friendly. No one knew about the bribes that some former Buncombe County officials are accused of accepting in exchange for county business.

The indictment said Wiseman took Creighton, Greene and Stone to places like Key West and Martha’s Vineyard as a condition for him to get business. The indictment said Buncombe County paid, at least in part, for the expenses because Wiseman billed the county for the approximate amounts. Wiseman’s records revealed the true expenses, according to the indictment.

Wiseman has not been charged with any crime, but the indictment said it is illegal in North Carolina for a contractor to make gifts or give favors to public officials with the power to award or administer contracts.

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